Opale
Dinzu Artefacts

/2016 - c-20

Each side presents a slow build, culminating in a retreat of one source at the benefit of another. The two pieces also work as one, with a gentle segue connecting the sides. Parts of “Secondo Solco” sound like a loom, conjuring images of Sleeping Beauty. As the plot begins to thicken, the sounds grow harsher, like the soul of the witch. In the closing minutes, it’s all hiss, a fairy tale rewritten, a happy ending denied. (Richard Allen)

Artist Statement
The research I’m carrying on from years is a sort of investigation of sounds in-between sounds you can get if you put your focus on small sound-areas, details you can reach during the play, far away from the simple surface of sound. It's like “explode and explore” an instrument, a substrate, a device, or a mix of them, but first of all it's a matter of practice in itself. The magnetic tape is a substrate for rough, dirty and indefinite sound surfaces that evolve while time is passing, I just need to create the conditions to let it happen and to accelerate this process.
It’s like a garden, where everything grows by itself and you need to make just a few things, to see what is going to happen most of the time.

[...] a slow build, culminating in a retreat of one source at the benefit of another. The two pieces also work as one, with a gentle segue connecting the sides. Parts of “Secondo Solco” sound like a loom, conjuring images of Sleeping Beauty. As the plot begins to thicken, the sounds grow harsher, like the soul of the witch.

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reviews

Cassette Gods / 2016

The inaugural Dinzu Artefacts batch – the label an extension of the Spring Break Tapes brand (but of course its own thing) – is a monument to sound sculpture. Let those words sink in for a second. Giovanni Lami, whose Opale consists of two sides, “Primo Solco” and “Secondo Solco,” has concocted, for his part, a piece of experimental music that defies the traditional boundaries of concept and execution, of the physical and audible. It’s like he’s placed a theoretical audio mirror in the same room as all the source material he’s drawn from for Opale, and in doing so the monument becomes a monument to the monument, a sound sculpture chiseled in ProTools (or whatever) that acts as a sound sculpture to his sound sculpture. The mirror becomes itself, reflecting whatever it’s defining into infinity, and therefore ends up becoming defined by it. Lami, a Ravenna-born artist (that’s in Italy, you lazy map truthers), literally builds Opale, his sonic carpentry coalescing itself into one structure or another before moving on to the next level. Field recordings mix with ambient texture, resulting in combinations that are almost tangible. Lami’s experimental processes are never less than interesting, as each moment escapes pure sound and becomes physically tactile, a magic trick that my imagination completes as the willing participant. Each side stretches over ten minutes, and getting lost in the pieces is the easy part – reacclimating yourself to the world as you remember it is the tricky bit. Opale is perfect for museum earbud accompaniment as you stroll through corridors of modern art. (Ryan Masteller)

a closer listen / 2016

Giovanni Lami‘s Opale delves into pops and clicks, rattles and screeches: another organic/electronic hybrid that can sound like an old swing or a faulty circuit, depending on the time. Each side presents a slow build, culminating in a retreat of one source at the benefit of another. The two pieces also work as one, with a gentle segue connecting the sides. Parts of “Secondo Solco” sound like a loom, conjuring images of Sleeping Beauty. As the plot begins to thicken, the sounds grow harsher, like the soul of the witch. In the closing minutes, it’s all hiss, a fairy tale rewritten, a happy ending denied. (Richard Allen)

Tabs Out / 2016

Dinzu Artefacts - first batch Art by Joe McKay Look At These Tapes would not be doing it's job if it didn't tell you to look at these tapes from Dinzu Artefacts' inaugural batch. This offshoot of Spring Break Tapes is tackling design with clinical precision, opting for winter-is-coming style covers, hygienic layouts, and a logo that made me punch an eagle square in it's beak. To be clear - they nailed it.

Tabs Out / 2016

https://beta.mixcloud.com/tabsout/tabs-out-cassette-podcast-episode-96/